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"...I been this way since 1956"

Posted 4/6/2010 8:47pm by Eugene Wyatt.

How 120 broke her leg, we don't know.  At birth her mother wouldn't accept her; maybe it happened when 120 was butted away in the jug.  The ewe was a first time mother and was so crazed that to help calm her I gave her 1 cc of Oxytocin which among other things* assists maternal behaviors and is sometimes called a "love potion" because it facilitates relationships.  After the injection the ewe  slowly became caring and finally let her lamb to the teat. 

Baby was saved.

But in the yard several days after her birth, I noticed 120 limping along on 3 legs and picked her up to find a broken leg.

It had to be set. 

I wrapped the leg in one of our knit wool hats that we found laying around the shepherd's room, cut two splints from oak and wrapped everything tightly with duct tape.  I gave the lamb 1/2 cc of Banamine, an analgesic, and put her on 1/4 cc of penicillin a day for a week.

120 is doing well, getting fat on mama's milk and peg-legging around like she's looking for a white whale; when she can put weight on the leg, in 2-3 weeks, we will cut the splint off.

*Oxytocin is a hormone active in female reproduction. Recent studies have begun to investigate it's role in various behaviors, including orgasm, social recognition, pair bonding, anxiety, trust, love, and maternal behaviors...from Wikipedia.  Generally, I have Oxytocin on hand at lambing to assist milk let down in recently lambed ewes that are dry.

12 Comments »
Barb Kahl said,
4/8/2010 @ 11:19 am
love the blog and the pictures of the sheep. I hope to own some one day, and reading your blog helps me see the "reality" not just the picturesque side of sheep.
Thanks
Eugene Wyatt said,
4/8/2010 @ 6:25 pm
In the movie Sweetgrass John, an old sheep herder, is asked what he's going to do now that the last sheep drive is over; he ponders the question and says, "Dunno, get me some sheep, I guess."
Francesca said,
5/20/2010 @ 1:52 am
I just read Clara Parkes's review of your yarn on Knitter's Review. Congratulations - I hope you ship overseas as eventually I would like to order from you and I'm in Malta - partly because your yarn sounds amazing, and partly because I don't buy Australian merino because of mulesing. This photo shows me the opposite attitude - love it.
Francesca
Peggy Wood said,
5/20/2010 @ 8:34 am
found your blog from Knitter's review. Alas I will probably never have the land to own sheep but am so glad to be able to vicariously "shepard". Have two herding dogs that manage me, 1 cardigan corgi and a pyrenean shepard. Love the Kelpies. thanks for sharing
Linda Byrd said,
5/20/2010 @ 10:12 am
I also just found your blog and online store from Knitter's Review. I will read regularly and plan to order from you soon.
Kshama Bilkha said,
5/20/2010 @ 11:42 am
Read about you on Knitter"s Review and want to thank you for sharing your life with the rest of us who will never have a chance to live on a farm. Will certainly order yarn from you in the future.
Darla Lazare said,
5/20/2010 @ 11:59 am
You're a wise man to share a sample of your yarn to Clara Parkes! As you can see, I and many others, are fans of her Knitter's Review. Your yarn sounds wonderful and I plan to order some soon.
Diane said,
5/20/2010 @ 6:01 pm
Like the others, I found your wonderful website from Knitters Review. I look forward to ordering some of your lovely yarn, and also to visiting your stall at Union Square the next time I'm in NYC.
Theresa said,
5/20/2010 @ 8:02 pm
I so enjoyed reading about Poem, you have surrounded yourself with two of my favorite things dogs and yarn (on and off the hoof! I live about 3 hours away and know where Goshen is, family had lived there for several years. Beautiful area. Maybe one day I will contact you and find out if I can visit the farm. Keep loving what you are doing, it shows and there is nothing better then following after a passion.
Eugene Wyatt said,
5/27/2010 @ 3:22 pm
Sheep are great.
curious said,
12/6/2012 @ 4:06 pm
I have a question. That lamb is so cute and you seem to care for it a lot, would it still end in the freezer one day?

I guess, I've always wondered how caring farmers can be toward their animals and still be able to kill them and eat them. How does this conundrum be resolve?

Eugene Wyatt said,
12/6/2012 @ 4:24 pm
http://www.catskill-merino.com/blog/14004
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