Pasture Raised Lamb 

Chops

Leg of Lamb

Rack of Lamb

And More...

Lamb Cooking Time

By Method, Cut And Weight 
Braising

Braising is a moist heat cooking method where lamb cuts are browned and cooked in a small amount of liquid. The liquid produces steam which helps tenderize the meat. Thus, this method of cooking is perfect for both small and large less tender cuts of lamb such as neck slices, shoulder cuts, riblets, breasts and shanks. A wide variety of lamb dishes may be braised.

To braise, heat a small amount of oil, fat or butter in a heavy frying pan and brown lamb on all sides. (The lamb may be first dusted with seasoned flour.) Pour off drippings and season as desired. Add a small amount of liquid such as water, vegetable juice or soup and vegetables. Cover pan tightly and cook at low temperature until tender. A sauce or gravy can be made from the cooking liquid.

Timetable for Braising Lamb

 
 

Lamb Cut

Weight or Size

Approximate Cooking Time

Neck Slices

1-3/4 pounds ¾ inch thick

1 to 1-1/2hour

Shoulder Chops, Round Bone or Blade

1-3/4 pounds 1 inch thick

1 to 1-1/4 hour

Breast, Stuffed (Bone-in)

2 to 3 pounds

1-1/2 to 2 hours

Riblets

3 pounds

1-1/2 to 2 hours

Shanks

3 pounds

1_to 1-1/2 hours

Stew Cubes

1-1/4 pounds 1 inch pieces

1-1/4 to 1-1/2 hours

Breast, Rolled

1-1/2 to 2 pounds

1-1/2 to 2 hours

  

 

Broiling

Preheat broiler according to manufacturer’s instructions. Place well trimmed lamb on rack in broiling pan and broil approximately 3 to 6 inches from heat source. Turn lamb over halfway and broil on second side until desired degree of doneness. Broiling time will vary depending on thickness and type of lamb cut. Use tongs to turn chops and steaks. Don’t use a fork as it will pierce the meat and allow juices to escape.

Timetable for Broiling Lamb

 

Lamb Cut

Thickness

Approximate Total Cooking Time

Shoulder Chops

¾ to 1 inch

10 to 12 minutes

Loin Chops

1 inch

9 to 12 minutes

Rib Chops

1 inch

9 to 12 minutes

Sirloin Steaks

¾ to 1 inch

9 to 14 minutes

Leg Steaks, Center Cut

¾ to 1 inch

11 to 18 minutes

Lamb Cubes

1 to 2 inch

7 to 22 minutes

Ground Lamb Patties

½ inch thick

7 to 12 minutes

 

 

Grilling

Because of its natural tenderness, lamb is ideal for grilling. Butterflied leg of lamb, lamb chops and steaks, kabobs and ground lamb patties are perfect for grilling. Other cuts include bone-in leg of lamb shoulder, rack and loin roasts, and ribs.

Boneless rolled roasts should be as round (cylindrical) as possible for even cooking. Steaks and chops should be at least 1-inch thick. Meat cubes for the skewer should be as uniform in size as possible.

Trim chops, steaks and roasts before cooking to eliminate smoke and fire flare-ups. Use tongs to turn lamb.

To grill, stack charcoal briquettes in a pyramid and preheat coals about 20-40 minutes; coals will be bright red and covered with gray ash. Because moderate temperatures are best for lamb, spread coals evenly apart.

Place chops, steaks, patties, kabobs and butterflied leg on a rack approximately 4 inches from coals. Cook to desired degree of doneness.

Chops, steaks and patties must be turned over halfway through cooking. Turn kabobs over several times and butterflied legs every 10 minutes during cooking. Grilling time will vary depending on the thickness and cut of lamb.

For rotisserie cooking, choose only compact, cylindrical lamb roasts for best results. Insert the rotisserie rod lengthwise through the center of the roast and test for balance by turning the rod in your hands. Make sure the meat is fastened securely to the rod so it won’t slip during cooking. Be sure to follow the manufacturer’s instructions for grilling with a rotisserie. 

Timetable for Grilling Lamb

 

Lamb Cut

Coal Temperature

Approximate Total Cooking Time prepared 4 inches from heat source

Shoulder Chops, Round Bone or Blade (1 inchthick)

Moderate

11 to 13 minutes

Loin Chops (1 inch thick)

Moderate

9 to 10 minutes

Rib Chops (1 inch thick)

Moderate

9 to 10 minutes

Sirloin Steaks (1 inch thick)

Moderate

9 to 10 minutes

Leg Steak, Center Cut (1 inch thick)

Moderate

10 to 12 minutes

Cubes for Kabobs (1 inch pieces)

Moderate

7 to 12 minutes

Lamb Patties (½ inch thick) (4 oz.)

Moderate

5 to 12 minutes

Butterflied Leg (4 to 7 lbs.)

Moderate

40 to 50 minutes

  

 

Roasting

Roasting is a dry heat cooking method where the lamb is cooked in an oven.

To prepare a lamb roast, simply place roast fat-side up on rack in open roasting pan, sprinkling with seasonings, as desired. Insert meat thermometer in the thickest muscle, being careful not to let the thermometer rest against a bone or in fat or the temperature reading will be inaccurate. Do not add water. Do not cover.

Roast to desired degree of doneness, following approximate time on timetable chart. Remove roasts from oven when thermometer registers about 10 degrees lower than the desired doneness. Allow to stand in a warm place for 10 to 15 minutes after removal from the oven to make slicing easier. During this period, the roast will continue to cook and internal temperatures will rise.

*Note: Larger roasts may take less roasting time per pound than smaller roasts.

Timetable for Roasting Lamb

 

Lamb Cut

Oven Temperature

Approximate Cooking Time

Legs, bone-in (5 to 7 pounds)

325°F

19 to 27 minutes per pound

Legs, bone-in (7 to 9 pounds)

325°F

14 to 20 minutes per pound*

Legs, boneless, rolled and tied (4 to 7 pounds)

325°F

28 to 34 minutes per pound

Sirloin Roast, boneless (1-1/4 to 1-3/4 pounds)

325°F

33 to 40 minutes per pound

Shoulder, pre-sliced (2 to 5 pounds)

325°F

30 to 35 minutes per pound

Rib roast, rack (1-1/2 to 2-1/2 pounds)

375°F

26 to 33 minutes per pound

Crown roast (not stuffed) (2 to 3 pounds)

375°F

19 to 30 minutes per pound

  

Courtesy of the American Lamb Board http://americanlambboard.org/